Does Your Church Need to be on Social Media?2 minute read

For many churches, the last priority is having an online presence. We often focus on our weekly services, outreach ministries, and small groups until our energy is spent, and posting to social media gets put on the back burner week after week.

Does your church even need to be on social media? Can’t we just focus on these face-to-face encounters and set our online presence to last priority?

Here’s the short answer:

Yes, your church needs to be on social media! 

I know it can be stressful, daunting, overwhelming, discouraging, and everything in between. But I promise that your church’s online presence is worth your time. 

While I’d love to go over the ins and outs of WordPress, Squarespace, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok with you all in this post,  I think it’s important we dive into the why of social media before addressing the how and what

Why should your church be on social media? 

1. Reach your congregation

If you took a poll of your congregation, I guarantee most (if not all) of them are avid users of at least one social media platform. The average user spends about an hour each day on Facebook. Your congregation is already using social media platforms, so the church should be using those platforms to reach the congregation.

Posting to Facebook or Instagram is a great way to reach your congregation with announcements, encouragement, conversation starters, and pray requests. Many people want to stay involved with their church community throughout the week, but they don’t know how. Social media can serve as a way to keep congregation members connected to your church and to one another throughout the week. 

P.S. While it might be tempting to use your social media accounts exclusively to promote face-to-face events, keep in mind that your followers want more engaging content than constant promotions. Consider posting photos of Sunday services, blog posts of the sermon, encouraging Bible verses, and other content that isn’t trying to rope people into your building. 

2. Reach your community 

Of the 247 million Facebook users in the US and Canada, how many do you think live, work, and study in your community? Social media and online presence is a great way to reach your community. Posts about service projects, outreach events, or encouragement to teachers or first responders show that your church is for your community. 

Your church’s social media is also a great tool for those in your community who are considering visiting your church. Most people do at least some research on a place before visiting it. Common questions might be: What does the building look like? What kind of people will I meet here? What do people wear at this church? Is there a place for my kids? Who will I hear from at this church?

To find these answers, maybe they do a quick Google search, check out the church’s website, or scroll through the church’s Instagram. Maintaining an online presence makes sure those potential first time guests have an accurate idea of what to expect when they walk into your church. Post pictures of your services, quotes from your pastor, information about your kids ministry, and more so your community can get a glimpse of what your church is like before ever visiting. 

3. Reach beyond your community 

Your church’s online presence also has the potential to reach beyond your community. Sharing recordings of sermons, photos of your parking team, or stories of life change helps people beyond your community see the impact your church is making. 

Not on social media? 

Start with Facebook. Making a Facebook page is fairly simple and can help your church reach your congregation, community, and beyond. 

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